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The State of iComics – Jan 2014

January 29, 2014 •

Since it’s been a fair few months since I’ve put out a new update for my little comic reader app project, I thought I’d quickly do an update on what stage it’s at.

At the moment, I’m aiming for finishing iComics version 1.1 (Shiny new picture above).
Some of the major features I plan to have in version 1.1 include:

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Disabling Timer Coalescing in OS X Mavericks

January 25, 2014 •

If you’re an iOS developer, and you’re still developing apps that support iOS versions below iOS 7 (Like I am), then you might have noticed after upgrading to OS X Mavericks that the iOS 6 Simulator runs absolutely terribly. EVERY single animation in there runs at an incredibly choppy frame-rate, which makes most kinds of app testing relatively useless.

Today, I learnt from a little birdie that the reason for this issue is due to the new Timer Coalescing feature, introduced in Mavericks:

In OS X Mavericks, Timer Coalescing groups low-level operations together, creating tiny periods of idle time that allow your CPU to enter a low-power state more often. With its activity reduced up to 72 per cent, the CPU uses less energy, giving your battery a break too. This happens so fast you won’t notice a thing. And your Mac still gets just as much done just as quickly.

Apple – OS X Mavericks – Advanced Technologies (January 2014)

It would seem to make sense that as a result of Timer Coalescing, the timers that power the iOS 6 Simulator animations are getting coalesced themselves, and this is resulting in the strange behaviour (Curiously enough, the iOS 7 Simulator is fine though!).

In any case, apparently there is a console command that lets you disable Timer Coalescing across the system:

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Happy new year chaps! 2014 is upon us!

December 31, 2013 •

Holy sweet freaking crap. Where did the year go!?

I can’t believe 2013 is over already. It feels like it’s too soon! Hopefully every year isn’t like this. What a roller-coaster ride it’s been!

At the end of every year, I like to do a quick reflection on the crazy crap I did in the year. It’s my goal in life to improve upon each year over the last. I find this a great way to set the bar for the next year. :)

This year, I was fortunate enough to:

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The best 3DS XL Carry Case

December 27, 2013 •

I don’t normally do product review-type posts here (Maybe I should? XD) but I was so impressed with this thing, and I’m so glad I was able to find it, that I think it definitely deserved one.

Most people who know me have probably noticed that I am very particular with transporting all of my gadgets in cases. This is mainly because I like to try and keep all of my gadgets in the best possible condition, and also because I can bundle accessories (like charging cables) with them much more easily.

So when I bought a limited edition Pokémon X/Y 3DSXL earlier this year, I immediately set out to find a nice case for it.

The problem with that though…. is there aren’t very many cases at all for the 3DS XL out there right now. I did a few trips to multiple game shops in my area looking for cases, but all I was able to find were really cheap vinyl ones that no person over the age of 10 would probably want to be caught carrying.

So resolving myself to the fact I’d have to order one online, I went about searching around on Google. Almost instantly, I found this post on Kotaku about a really high quality case: The Nintendo 3DSXL CitySlicker.

After reading a few more reviews for it, I decided to go ahead and order one. After a few days, it arrived. :)

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The PebblePad Portfolio Competition

November 8, 2013 •

Uh. So, I won an iPad Air today. Totally wasn’t expecting that. ^_^

Since I’ve been dropping cryptic tweets all day, I figured I better come clean and explain what happened.

A little while back, ECU (The university for which I am currently working.) started to implement a service called PebblePad for use by all of the course schools. PebblePad is a web system that allows users to quickly build professional grade online portfolio websites, that can then be used to present to potential emplyers once they have graduated.

As part of an initiative to promote PebblePad around the university, the PebblePad co-ordinators decided to hold a competition where people could submit their own portfolios in PebblePad, showing off their own skillset and learning evidence, with the prize being an iPad Air. There were 5 categories, ranging from first-year students through to academic staff, each with an iPad up for grabs.

The competition featured two components: produce a portfolio of sufficient quality to get short-listed, and then those short-listed would present their portfolio to a panel of judges at this year’s ECULTURE conference.

Sounding very intrigued (Especially at the premise of a new iPad!), I asked the lead co-ordinator if it was feasible for myself to enter, and thankfully, she said I would be perfect for the ECU graduates category.

So with that all squared away, I built a portfolio in PebblePad and submitted it to the competition. It took a few days of reading PebblePad documents and watching YouTube tutorial videos, and a few extra days to actually design and implement the portfolio, but in the end, I was able to produce this:

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The Talking Pokédex App

October 4, 2013 •

Back when I was working on iPokédex, I had a pretty lofty, outrageous end-goal for the project: to get it to replicate the experience of a Pokédex from the TV show as closely as possible. Given the device on the TV show was a complete fantasy device in the year of 1998, I found the concept of owning a device with the remote possibility of realising that in 2008 incredibly exciting.

That being said, there was one aspect of a functioning Pokédex on iOS that was never quite possible for me to implement: the ability to synthesis audible speech.

Now, iPhone and iPad have had built-in speech capabilities since as early as iOS 3.0 (Well, iPhoneOS 3.o back then) . At that point, it was mainly used for accessibility purposes (So people with poor eyesight could interact with the devices), but it became way more exposed when Apple brought out Siri in iOS 5.

Unfortunately, the speech synthesis API has always been a private one, meaning it’s not normally possible to use it without a small bit of hacking, and even still, if an app containing it was submitted to the App Store, it would instantly get rejected by the automatic submission process.

Nevertheless, I had a play with this private API back in 2011 to see what it could theoretically be capable of.

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